marthajefferson:

artdetails:

Tughra (Official Signature) of Sultan Suleiman. Istanbul, Turkey. c. 1555-1560. Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper.

(via staniamstan)

(Source: porcvpine, via triniwindowseat)

mymodernmet:

Photographer Diggie Vitt's brilliant eye for composition and compellingly eerie narratives are at the heart of his beautifully surreal images.

(via beenghosting)

But who prays for Satan? Who, in eighteen centuries, has had the common humanity to pray for the one sinner that needed it most?

Mark Twain

This is honestly my favorite quote. It’s changed how I look at life and religion.

(via diplosomia)

(Source: the-bitchextraordinaire, via triniwindowseat)

sagansense:

itscolossal:

The Cloud: An Interactive Thunderstorm in Your House

It will be mine. Oh yes. It will be mine. And my literal “brainstorming room" will be complete.

(Source: really-shit, via beenghosting)

theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

angry-comics:

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a list of useful writing exercises

(via goddessdster)

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

(Source: beautifullife.info, via caughtinanocean)

(Source: yummy-chocolaty)

timeshaiku:

A haiku from the article: Life Outside the Hospital; Consequences of Cool; You’re So Far Away
duncangeorge:

Bodiam Castle

duncangeorge:

Bodiam Castle

escapekit:

Paper Birds

Artist and designer Diana Beltran Herrera creates stunning accurate reproductions of birds using paper. The fragile sculptures are a mix of private commissions and pieces for several luxury brands who use her work in displays and advertising. 

(Source: thisiscolossal.com, via numberts)

odditiesoflife:

Lighted Fairy Woodhouses

Boston-based freelance artist Daniel Barreto combined houses with trees in a series of lovely photo manipulations titled Woodhouses. Barreto photographed parts of houses around Boston, and superimposed them onto images of tree trunks that he had taken in New Hampshire. The charming Woodhouses were even animated for effect, and resemble fairy’s houses in an enchanted forest. 

(Source: designtaxi.com, via songstersmiscellany)

leslieseuffert:

Alberto Seveso - South African artist Chris Slabber has created a spectacular new series called Destruction/Creation, which features images of gorgeous “sculptures” formed from paint swirling in water.

[Via My Modern Met]

(via cellardoortumbles)